Thursday, January 26, 2017

Thursday Morning Superhero

Joe Hill and company have teamed up with Israel Skelton to raise money for the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and other charities.  Proceeds from items containing the Biblio Key that can be purchased here will raise money for some extremely valuable causes.  I have a couple of keys (and some great Chew items!) from Skelton Studio and have been blown away by everything.  Hill promises that the Biblio Key will make an appearance in a future Locke and Key issue and the keys in this sale are limited to 600 and contain multiple signatures, including Hill and Locke and Key artist Gabriel Rodriguez.  Go buy an amazing collectible and support a worthy cause!



Pick of the Week:
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #66 - I am a huge fan of Alopex and am thrilled to have another issue that revolves around her story after she vanished a few issues back after trying to kill Splinter and the Turtles.  Alopex's development throughout this series has been an absolute joy.  She was an interesting villain working with the Shredder, but evolved into more than a mutant fox who was a foe to the turtles.  She became a character that I invested in, only to have Kitsune take control of her mind and force her back towards the darker side of things.  Raph and Angle have tracked Alopex to Alaska and are making one last attempt to help her rid herself of the demons that plague her.  In addition to the development that Alopex has had throughout the series, her impact on Raph is noteworthy and has really changed the dynamic of him and his relationship to everyone else.  It is nice to find closure in this arc and I cannot wait to see what lies ahead now that this book is closed.

The Rest:
Saga #42 - This issue was a giant punch in the gut and I curse Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples for making me feel things.  The final pages of this issue are extremely powerful and will haunt my dreams for the weeks to come.








Dept. H #10 - Matt and Sharlene Kindt's underwater Whodunit continues this week as we gain some valuable insight into what could be motivation for the murder.  Through a heartfelt flashback, we learn about Mia's childhood and how her father's devotion to his exploration came at the expense of her mother and other relationships.  This issue was a nice break from the drama that is currently happening in the underwater lab, and shined some valuable light on what Mia was like as a child.  I love the breadth of characters that the Kindt's have delivered and have enjoyed peering into the past in an attempt to uncover what is happening in the present.



Daredevil #16 - I continue to enjoy the hell out of Charles Soule's run with the Man without Fear.  If you recall, Daredevil put a bounty on his own head to deal with the grief of what happened to Blindspot, only to find out that Bullseye ended up taking someone up on the offer.  In addition to punching a lot of baddies in an attempt to make sense of what happened, Daredevil speaks to a Catholic priest to attempt to put everything into a proper context.  Turns out this priest is a member of The Ordo Draconum, a militant Catholic order founded in the 15th century.  Through his self reflection via the priest's advice and through stopping Bullseye, Daredevil is ready to move on and wraps things up confessing his true identity to the priest.  I am excited to see what the next arc will bring us!

Star Wars #27 - In an odd flashback of an issue, we continue with the story of Yoda and things have taken an odd turn.  It seems the planet that was calling to Yoda is inhabited only by children and has a mountain that seems to be made up of a blue rock that is filled with the force.  This draws Yoda to the mountain, only to lead to his capture by another group of children who chain him up in chains made up of this mysterious blue rock.  While it was far from my favorite issue in the series, there is enough mystery to bring me back to learn more of this mountain.




POSTED BY MIKE N. aka Victor Domashev -- comic guy, proudly raising nerdy kids, and Nerds of a Feather contributor since 2012. 

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